Thursday, November 27, 2014

New Indie Book Release: Eejit (Andrew Hindle)


New Indie Book Release:
Eejit: A Tale of the Final Fall of Man - Andrew Hindle
Science-Fiction (312 pages - November 2014)

Eejit is the first tale of The Final Fall of Man, a science-fiction story about - among other things - the human race and how we either won or lost it, depending on your point of view.

About the Book

Eejit (Andrew Hindle)
Click to Read an Excerpt
Six untrained civilians.
Two seasoned officers and two radically unspaceworthy scientists.
One mad alien inventor.
And six hundred and twenty-eight clone crewmen with severe intelligence-formatting errors.

In the Thirty-Ninth Century, great men and women of the human race strode among the stars and trod the jewelled thrones of the universe under their sandal’d feet.
Well, they weren’t wearing sandals, they were mostly wearing spacesuits because that was just plain common sense. And there weren’t really any jeweled thrones as such – not as far as anyone knew – so much as dusty ice-balls and emptiness and some algae in a couple of places. But human beings went out there and stepped in that algae, and then tracked it back into their star-ship airlocks and then looked around behind themselves as they walked on through into their recreation areas and said “oh damn, was that me?”
Yes, human beings did that.

And sometimes the algae turned out to be highly contagious or flesh-eating or toxic or fecund beyond terrestrial comprehension, and sometimes those human beings who had brought it on board their star-ships all died in graphic, horrible ways. And sometimes the emptiness turned out to be not quite so empty, and those human beings who had blundered into it had all their things taken away from them or were never heard from again.

And sometimes the ice turned out to have terrifying alien monsters capable of perfectly impersonating their hapless prey frozen inside just waiting to be dug out and thawed for some reason, and those human beings seemed to be okay but you never could be quite sure about them again after that.
But these incidents were rare, and there were always more human beings. Making more human beings was one of human beings’ all-time favorite things to do. It was basically the cornerstone of their entire civilization.

So they spread, and as a species – with a little help from their friends – they survived. And they prospered and flourished. And they were noble and poetic and fearless and, occasionally, they were colossal bastards. But, in those final years of the human race, they mostly got it right.
The swan song of homo sapiens sapiens was sweet and sad and, if not harmonious, then at least glorious. If you’re going to go out on a song, as a rather famous entertainer once said, make it a beautiful, beautiful song. And if you can’t do that, well – make it deafening.

Yes, in the Thirty-Ninth Century, great men and women of the human race strode among the stars.
Also, these guys were there.






About the Author

Author Andrew Hindle
Author Andrew Hindle
Andrew Hindle is an Australian living in Finland and an I-can-quit-anytime-I-want Technical Writer living in denial. He's accompanied on his long-term mission by his dauntless wife Janica and his amazing daughters Elsa and Freja.

When he beat cancer in 2011, he decided to stop sitting around on the remains of his backside, and actually start telling people his stories.

This is one of them.


Connect with Andrew Hindle via the Author's Website
and on Twitter: @St_EdPool.




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